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campnfish
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8 years ago 0 campnfish 6 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
It said to introduce myself

So here I am.  I quit smoking 39 days ago and am still struggling with wanting to smoke.  I thought I would be over it by now.  I smoked almost 2 packs a day for 40 years, but know nicotine only stays in your system for about 72 hours.  I quit once before cold turkey about 20 years ago for 1 year and went back and haven't been able to quit longer than a couple of months.  I quit cold turkey again this time but it's much harder.  Will I EVER stop wanting to smoke?  It doesn't seem to be so much of a craving as it is a wanting, or feeling like I'm missing something.  Is this normal?  Does it go away?
campnfish
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8 years ago 0 campnfish 6 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
It said to introduce myself

Well I chew a lot of gum.  This really works for me replacing my after meal cigarette and really those are not the ones that bother me the most.  I have also started training for the Susan G. Komen 3 Day walk in August, so I also have been walking.  The 3 day has been my biggest motivator for quitting smoking.  I have a 26 year old daughter who has been battling breast caner for the last year.  I did not smoke around her, and I went threw the shame and embarrassment of going to all of her surgeries, dr. appointments, and chemo treatments knowing I smelled like smoke.  I have watched my brave daughter  battle and survive this disease and decided I had enough and was going to train to walk the 60 miles over 3 days.   I was going to quit on March 24 for her birthday, but got overly enthusiastic and quit on March 10.  My darling daughter is walking by my side. Thank you so much for the encouragement and information, it does make sense now that something that was by my side for so long will take more than a month to get used to being gone. 
campnfish
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8 years ago 0 campnfish 6 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
It said to introduce myself

Wow nice to know I'm not the only one!  I forgot about the crying too, though it has become quite comical that I cry at some of the stupidest stuff.  I feel much better knowing all of this will go away eventually.  I know all too well about the NOPE.  The first time I quit 20 years ago I was quit for a year, got over confident at a wedding and thought I could smoke "just one."  Well you guessed it that one turned into I'll quit again after this pack, this carton, etc....Now 20 years later I finally quit.  And the thing was,  that one puff I took tasted like crap!
campnfish
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8 years ago 0 campnfish 6 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
am i doing the right thing

If I may also recommend a book:  Quitting smoking for Dummies. :)  I ordered this from Amazon and it was a huge help.  It gives you straight up honest options and information about smoking, quitting, and NRT (nicotine replacement therapy.)   Good Luck in your quit, I'll be pulling for you!
campnfish
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8 years ago 0 campnfish 6 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Losing My Resolve

I'm not sure what site I read this on but it made sense to me.  You will go through triggers in your first year quit as the seasons change because you are engaging in activities without cigs that you used to do with cigarettes.  I know this is my first spring without a cig EVER.  I was one of those who was born smoking.  I knew the triggers were coming so I could prepare.  For example, my fishing pole and my cigarette were best friends, but I found I could actually still catch fish without a cigarette hanging out of my mouth, in fact it was much easier to reel without smoke blowing in my eyes!  Instead of taking a break from my gardening and smoking, I would still sit in my favorite lawn chair and have a glass of tea and think about how lucky I am that I can actually smell the flowers I just planted.  A lot of people are taken by surprise triggers at seasons change, just know they are coming and be prepared....
campnfish
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8 years ago 0 campnfish 6 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
CONFUSED, SCARED AND ALL MIXED UP

Skier, you are definitely on the right track by educating yourself on the nicotine addiction.  Congratulations! and Hooray for you!  Whyquit.com is an excellent source of information.  I know when I first started the steps to prepare to quit it scared the heck out of me.  But I found the one thing that has helped me and continues to help me.  When I sat down and made the list of why I really wanted to quit, I had to really look at WHY.  Not why my children wanted me to quit, or my boss, or society, but why I wanted to quit.  And the truth was I wanted to run.  Yep, I was always envious of those athletes and people who could run.  See as a smoker, even in middle school, I didn't run.  My addict brain would tell me ahhh who wants to do that, have a smoke instead.   At 50 years old and 2.5 packs a day, running was definitely out of the question.  In fact walking on some days was a challenge.  Well I took a good long hard look at the truth and where I would end up if I continued on the path I was on.  I read everything I could about smoking, about addiction and about running.  I started looking at athletes I admired.  The first thing I did was made the commitment to walk.  I signed up for the Susan G. Komen 3 day.  At first I could only do  half a mile.  I'm up to 15 miles now.  That is the amazing thing.  How quickly my body started recovering.  I am also training to run my first race in September!  I guess my point is that if you find YOUR reason to quit...It will work.  Please Please believe the people on here who have done it.  We all know what you are going through, and we have all been there.  It is SO worth it.